sewing

Mini Traverse and Perkins Shirt

Traverse Bag (Mini) - NoodleheadTraverse Bag (Mini) - Noodlehead Traverse Bag (Mini) - Noodlehead Traverse Bag (Mini) - Noodlehead Happy Spring! I’m so happy to be joining in today for the Style Maker Fabrics Spring Style Tour! Just seeing Michelle’s Spring fabric lineup makes me happy. If you’re not familiar, Style Maker Fabrics is a well rounded fabric shop filled with all sorts of great fabrics. What I love most about that is I can do my fabric shopping for more than just a bag or garment, I can do both! She carries everything from denims to knits, to beautiful flowy tencel twills, rayons and more. It’s pretty much a treasure trove of fabric.

Traverse Bag (Mini) - NoodleheadTraverse Bag (Mini) - Noodlehead

Traverse Bag (Mini) - Noodlehead

So I chose this stunning barkcloth for the mini version of my Traverse Bag pattern. I’ve always loved this small version, and for me it’s just the right size for Spring and Summer! I love changing things up and when the seasons change, so part of that usually involves making a new bag for myself. Out with the old and in with the new. Yes please! Michelle helped me pair it with this periwinkle double ikat shirting for the lining and a neon slub chambray shirting for the accent. It was fun to make one again. I love being able to set my mind on autopilot (with a good podcast of course) and just sew. It really is relaxing. I love knowing the steps and not having to double check things as I go. It’s a nice change of pace from pattern writing and editing!

Traverse Bag (Mini) - Noodlehead

Perkins Shirt by Ensemble Patterns - Noodlehead

Perkins Shirt by Ensemble Patterns - Noodlehead

I also got this Royal Tencel Twill Shirting and paired it with the Perkins Shirt pattern by Ensemble Patterns. I had bought the pattern months ago after seeing a bunch pop up on Instagram. It looked like an interesting sew and I really loved the sleeve and gathers. The pattern was a really fun one to tackle. I absolutely love the construction. There are no seams that you need to finish, all are enclosed or french seams which is a really awesome feature. It was a relief too because I didn’t have any serger thread to match at all!

Perkins Shirt by Ensemble Patterns - Noodlehead

Perkins Shirt by Ensemble Patterns - Noodlehead

The Tencel Twill is really such a beautiful fabric, it has a lovely drape without being too lightweight. I’m not sure I would naturally gravitate to the royal color, but it is fun to mix things up a bit.

Perkins Shirt by Ensemble Patterns - Noodlehead

Perkins Shirt by Ensemble Patterns - Noodlehead

Patterns: Traverse Bag (mini option) and Perkins Shirt (I sewed the Regular length, size 6, with gathers and pointed collar) by Ensemble Patterns
Fabrics: Japanese Abstract Brushstroke Barkcloth, Periwinkle Ikat, and Neon Slub Chambray for the bag, Royal Tencel Twill Shirting for the shirt all fabrics provided by Style Maker Fabrics

Grab a Traverse Bag Hardware Kit here, too!

#stylemakerfabrics #smfstyletour #springstyletour19 @stylemakerfabrics

Perkins Shirt by Ensemble Patterns - Noodlehead

knitting

My Range Shawl

Range Shawl - NoodleheadRange Shawl - Noodlehead Range Shawl - NoodleheadSo, believe it or not, I do knit from time to time. It’s been a long time since I’ve finished anything though. I did manage a pair of mittens at the end of 2017, but other than that, no time for knitting in 2018 until right before Christmas. I figured it was the perfect time to pick up a project that I had started months before, my Range Shawl. I checked back on my Instagram and I had picked out the yarn for the Range Shawl pattern back in 2016. It was a lofty goal for me back then anyway, but there were quite a few obstacles I needed to jump before working on this project in earnest.

Range Shawl - Noodlehead

Once I felt that most of the studio stuff was taken care of, I felt a bit of time in the evenings open up. Especially in winter it was where I had time to sit down and work on this shawl. I hadn’t ever made a shawl before. In fact, I hadn’t knit anything flat before either. The big leap for me though was learning brioche. It seemed pretty insurmountable to me with only having a few years and a handful of finished knit projects under my belt. I was determined though, ever since the pattern was released I’ve been dying to make it. So I sat down one Saturday with a winter storm and tried and tried figuring it out! My friend Jeni recommended this video which really helped get a visual on things. The pattern is so clearly written though, too. I look back now and think that it was so much easier than what I had built it up to be. So once I got one brioche section under my belt it felt really great! I did have quite a few times where I made mistakes and had to go back and try and fix. I kept using life lines after each section which was necessary for me!

Range Shawl - Noodlehead

This was a great project to start learning brioche! Because the shawl is worked corner-t0-corner it helped me by knowing there was only a small section to work on at first. Of course I could have tried using some scrap yarn and practiced, but I jumped right in. I will say though that for the two color brioche it is much easier to see what you’re doing when you have yarns that have more contrast. My first section of brioche didn’t have as much contrast so it was a bit harder to learn that way. I do love the way the colors transition though.

Range Shawl - NoodleheadRange Shawl - Noodlehead

Range Shawl - Noodlehead

I ran out of my one color of yarn, but luckily it was enough to do one repeat in the tweed section. I don’t think it’s too noticeable and I really could care less that it doesn’t follow the pattern exactly. I ended up doing an extra repeat of the other tweed section instead.

Range Shawl - Noodlehead

I feel so excited and proud about finishing this shawl! It feels like such a big accomplishment in my knitting. It took me from the end of December until the end of February to knit, just a bit of time each night with a few longer spurts in between.

Pattern: Range Shawl by Andrea Mowry of Drea Renee Knits
Yarn: Tosh DK in Celadon and Silver Fox by Madelinetosh, Trusty in Overcoat by Plucky Knitter, CFC Merino Worsted in Cenote by Camellia Fibers Co.

Range Shawl - Noodlehead

sewing

Studio Update: Drywall and more

Hello hello! I figured it would be fun to share more of the progress pictures I took during renovations of my studio space. I’ve been moved in and mostly set up in the space since the first week of November 2018. There has been a lot of tweaking of furniture and I think I’m mostly settled on how the space is flowing now. Although, I like to change my mind, so that could get switched up at any moment. Actually, the space is very flexible so it’s nice not to feel confined to a certain layout. Also a big part of what I kept getting hung up on was how I would use the space. For now it’s where I work and keep my pattern and supply inventory for my shop. It’s been amazing to have everything out of my house! I’ve hosted a few small events just for fun, it was nice to see the space full with people! I’m still getting my bearings and hopefully will be able to settle on any additional things I might be doing in the future (think pop-ups, hosting craft classes, having a small retail section, hosting a community sewing/crafting night, etc.). Lots of possibilities but I’m okay with waiting and letting things fall into place first. Plus it’s been one of those winters with lots of gray days so I’ve been allowing myself the time and space to not rush into anything.

So I’ll just pick up where I left off in my last update post. The drywall went up without a hitch, it was actually one of the smoothest processes throughout the project. And it totally transformed the space over the course of a few (hot!) days! It was best left to the experts with the high ceilings and large expanses. After that I spent Labor day weekend painting everything. My mom helped and even my kids got in on the action.

Next up was the electrical getting mostly finished up. All the light fixtures that I had bought months before could finally leave my living room and be installed. It was really fun to see something more final in the space! After the electrical was finished up the flooring was installed. Again, best left to an expert considering the large stretch of flooring. I did sign on to tile both the bathrooms myself though! I have done a bit of tiling in our house and previous houses, but it had been a while. It’s hard work, but very rewarding. I set the tile one weekend and then came back a few days later to grout. At the same time that was happening the back parking lot was being finished, and it was pouring rain for dayssssss. It all felt like a hot mess for a while.

All during those weeks I had also been painting the interior trim work. And man, if we could have scheduled that with a painter I so would have! Priming and painting took forever. I spent what felt like weeks heading out to prime and then weeks to paint. Small bits at a time here and there, it felt like I lived in my painting clothes. Luckily my mom helped again, but it was such a process because every day was rain and humidity so paint dried very slowly in our small garage where I painted. But eventually we got to haul the trim to the building and a couple of carpenters spent almost two weeks installing the trim work. They also set the base cabinets for the kitchenette which was fun. And wow, that part just was so amazing to watch.

After the trim work was complete we spent time building the furniture and the plumbing got installed (yay toilets and sinks finally!) as well as the HVAC getting wrapped up. We built the back packing table out of Ikea kitchen base cabinets and then finished the back with bead board. We built the top from birch veneer plywood and stained with a white pickling stain. I really like how it turned out and the cabinets are so nice to have! We also built a main center island that sits under the white pendants. It turned out really well, even after multiple trips to Ikea, which is a couple hour drive each way for us. I had my friend Heidi build the counter for it, she used reclaimed wood and then stained it a lovely rich dark gray color (she also made my floating kitchenette shelves from more reclaimed wood). I’ll show that off in my next post.

The kitchenette counter got installed several weeks later as well as the window sills. I chose Silestone which I think is going to hold up amazingly well compared to any other material. So that’s mostly it. I think I’ll save the rest of the furniture details for another post. I’m still not completely organized though, for example, the cabinets where I’m keeping my fabric is a semi-disaster, but I’ll get around to it.

I feel like this post is such a sweeping summary of the process. It was the hardest project I’ve even been a part of. There were so many questions, so many steps, so much coordination, and so much sweat equity. I joke that it was my second full-time job, and it was. Even though my husband and I split the work, it was overwhelming and at times we definitely wanted to just give up. But we pulled through and now it’s still kind of surreal to work here. Grateful for having a dedicated space, but still am in the phase of “we actually did this”. There are a few small things left such as grills for the divided wall window openings and a bit of trim under the window sills. I’m also on the search for finding some antiques and am gathering inspiration to finish up the bathrooms!

So thanks for reading if you made it this far! I’ll post more about the furniture and finish details in my next post. And, I have a couple new patterns coming up that I’m very excited about. I’ve been using my sample of one of the patterns non-stop and I can’t wait to show it to you!