Quilting

ten-square quilt mini tutorial

babyquilt

Hope you had a great weekend! It’s definitely starting to feel like fall here and I couldn’t be more excited for all the fall activities.

I thought I’d share a quick how-to on making the baby quilt I made a few weeks ago. You can find the original post here. I do want to point out that there are probably many ways to make this quilt. I don’t believe one way is more correct than another, so if you’ve found something that works better for you, go for it. I wanted to make the best use of this 10-square (some manufacturers call this a layer cake, either way, it’s a grouping of 10″ squares) with minimal leftovers and without a lot of planning. Again, this 10-square is by Jennifer Sampou and it’s her Shimmer Coordinates 10-Square.What that means for me is that I made the quilt in a somewhat unconventional way in order to have the most variety among the blocks. Using what I believe to be a more a traditional method, you would have duplicate blocks, but with the small number of full squares in the 10-square, I knew I’d have to do some mixing and matching.

quilt

Start by making half square triangles (HSTs). Place two full squares right sides together. Using a ruler and pencil, mark a line diagonally across the top square.favorite baby quilt by Anna Graham

Sew 1/4″ on both sides of the line. Cut on marked line.10packtutorial-02

Without picking up block, cut on the diagonal in the other direction. Press seams open. I didn’t plan out how many I made, instead I made 5-6 at a time (chain piecing) until I ran out of full squares to match them up with later on.

10packtutorial-03

Now you’ll have units that look like this:

10packtutorial-04

Place right sides together with a full square, being sure to grab two different HSTs (this is the key to getting the most variety). Align the cut HST to the outer edges of the full square. There will be about a 1″ gap between the two HSTs. Carefully pin the HSTs to the full square along the cut edge. Please note that where you are sewing the HSTs to the full square will be on the bias. Carefully pin and take your time to avoid stretching. Trim into two blocks using the HSTs raw edge as a guide for a 1/4″ seam allowance. Press seam open.10packtutorial-05

Keep going until you can’t make any more blocks. I had 3 blocks and maybe 4 HSTs leftover from my 10-pack after I finished my layout. Trim blocks to 9″ square aligning diagonal seam lines to ruler markings.10packtutorial-06

Lay out blocks in 6 rows of 6. Sew the blocks into rows. Press seams open. Sew rows together pressing seams open.

That’s it, your quilt top is finished! Hope this helps a bit for anyone who was curious. Let me know if you have questions, or if I’ve left anything out!

It’s a pretty quick quilt top! Finishes at approximately 51″ square.

folded

Quilting

Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial

Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Noodlehead

I’m sharing a tutorial for the pincushions I featured a few weeks ago. My inspiration came from a classic quilt design, the Wagon Wheel and by the quilt pattern in Denyse Schmidt’s Modern Quilts Traditional Inspiration. I hope you’ll enjoy this tutorial and make a few for you and your friends!

Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Noodlehead

Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Noodlehead

Materials:

From scraps, cut:

  • (1) 1 1/4″ square
  • (4) 1 1/4″ x 2 1/2″ rectangles
  • (4) 2 1/2″ squares
  • (1) 2″ tall x 13″ wide band
  • (1) circle for bottom using template (not pictured below)

Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna Graham

1/4″ seam allowance unless otherwise noted.

Instructions:

  1. Fold band in half widthwise right sides together. Sew. Press seam open.Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna Graham
  2. Mark band into quarters by first aligning seam and marking opposite folded edge within seam allowance on both top and bottom edges. Then open band and align previous markings and mark folded edges as before.Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna Graham
  3. Sew patchwork top together, sewing right sides together into rows. Press seams open.Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna Graham
  4. Sew rows together matching seams. Press seams open.Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna Graham
  5. Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna GrahamTrim patchwork top to a circle by using template. Use markings as a guide to align to patchwork strips.Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna Graham Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna Graham
  6. With right sides together, pin band to patchwork top aligning quarter markings. Add additional pins between quarter markings if desired. Sew around perimeter with band facing up.pincushion10 Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna Graham
  7. Mark bottom piece into quarters by folding in half and marking at fold line. Open and refold in half the opposite direction aligning markings and mark at fold line.Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna Graham
  8. Repeat Step 4 to attach bottom piece.Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna Graham
  9. With a seam ripper, carefully open up seam in band. You’ll need to open the seam almost to the seam of the top and bottom circles.Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna Graham
  10. Turn pincushion right side out.
  11. Stuff with polyester stuffing (or combination filling of your choice – rice/beans/crush walnut shells add nice weight).Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna Graham
  12. Sew opening in band closed by hand using a ladder stitch.Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna GrahamWagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Anna Graham
  13. Press entire top and bottom of pincushion and shape pincushion by placing under a book overnight for a nice even pincushion.

Fabrics: Rain Walk (by me!), Curiosities by Jeni Baker,
Cotton + Steel Basics, Carolyn Friedlander (Architextures and Doe)

You can find Rain Walk at these fine shops!


pincushions5

Wagon Wheel Pincushion Tutorial by Noodlehead

Enjoy!