Informational

Tassel Tutorial

Tassel Tutorial - Noodlehead

There’s a million ways to make a tassel and because I’m seeing them everywhere now I figured it would be fun to share a little how-to with you! I had quickly made one before taking the final photos of my Explorer Tote pattern. I love how it adds a little fun and interest, plus it’s removable. So here we go…

Materials:

  • soft leather works best (try suede or garment weight leathers or upcycle some leather from a jacket/pants/skirt from the thriftstore)
  • glue (for your particular material), I used Elmer’s ProBond Advanced and it worked so well!

Tassel Tutorial - Noodlehead

Because tassels come in all sizes it’s a really great project to use up small scraps! And materials are really something you can experiment with as well. I’ve seen people using cork fabric and they look amazing, so I’m guessing vinyl and just about anything else that doesn’t fray much would work just as well! Give it a try, it’s a low-commitment kind of project, so if something doesn’t work out it’s okay to start over. Also, check on etsy for scraps!

You also might want to consider adding other elements such as wooden beads or even metal beads would be great, too.

I’ll walk through the dimensions of this specific tassel, but take these basic steps and adjust them to make your unique piece, anything goes!

Tassel Tutorial - Noodlehead

Cut your leather (or material of your choice):

  • 5″ square for main body of tassel
  • 3/8″ wide x 8″ tall for hanging loop
  • 1/4″ wide (or less) x 12″ strip for decorative finish

 

Tassel Tutorial - Noodlehead

Next, cut the fringe! This part is super fun. And it totally doesn’t have to be precise. If you’d like though, use a ruler, cutting mat and rotary cutter and cut the fringe 1/4″ wide each and 3 1/2″ from the bottom edge. You can certainly use a scissors and eyeball it, too!

Tassel Tutorial - Noodlehead

 

After the fringe is all cut, align the the 3/8″ wide hanging loop piece, folded in half, to the very left side of the main tassel piece. You’ll want to place it at least a 1/2″ down from the top edge so that it won’t pull from the tassel once it’s finished.

Tassel Tutorial - Noodlehead

Then go ahead and layer on the glue, you’ll need much less than you think. Here’s a shot of mine before I started rolling from the left. If you do have excess like I did, work quickly to wipe it off. I used a paper towel and it cleaned up really well. When you’re rolling the tassel just keep in mind to keep the top edge of the tassel aligned.

Tassel Tutorial - Noodlehead

Once you have it completely rolled, wipe any excess glue and hold in place for a few seconds. The glue I used holds really well, so it only took maybe 30 seconds before I was able to let go.Tassel Tutorial - Noodlehead

Next step is totally optional of course, but I used the thin strip and wrapped it around the main part of the tassel towards the top and double knotted it. After everything is dry you can loop it around a bag’s handle.Tassel Tutorial - Noodlehead

Tassel Tutorial - Noodlehead

That’s all! It really is a super quick and fun project that’s great for scraps! Hope you’ll give one a try!

Tassel Tutorial - Noodlehead

 

Bags, Wallets, and Zips

Tiny Treasures Basket & Tray Free Pattern

Tiny Treasures Basket & Tray Free Pattern - Noodlehead

Tiny Treasures Basket & Tray Free Pattern - Noodlehead

Yayyyyy! I’m sharing this fun (and free!) basket and tray pattern that I made up using Carolyn Friedlander’s new fabric collection for Robert Kaufman Fabrics – Euclid. It’s printed on gorgeous essex linen and I think it might be my favorite collection of hers yet.

Tiny Treasures Basket & Tray Free Pattern - Noodlehead

Tiny Treasures Basket & Tray Free Pattern - Noodlehead

I was dreaming up what project to make using Euclid and a basket kept coming to mind. The Euclid designs are perfect for home dec items, have you seen these gorgeous napkins? I definitely need some of those in my life. I think the basket and tray are so useful and you can never have too many places to hold all your favorite things, right?! Plus, this set is perfect for pairing up and displaying on your coffee table, dresser, or even in your sewing space. They’re so great for collecting and displaying small treasures. I especially like to think that the basket is perfect for yarn whereas the tray fits a small scissors, thread, and notions so nicely.

Tiny Treasures Basket & Tray Free Pattern - Noodlehead

They’re a fun almost origami-like shape and the leather handles and rivets look so amazing. You could definitely sew fabric handles or get creative using thick wool felt and hand stitch them on. Either way, I hope you’ll use this free pattern and have some fun with it! I can’t wait to see what you make.

Tiny Treasures Basket & Tray Free Pattern - Noodlehead


Pattern: Tiny Treasures Basket & Tray Pattern
Fabric: Euclid by Carolyn Friedlander (coming to shops in August!)


Tiny Treasures Basket & Tray Free Pattern - Noodlehead

Let me know in the comments if you’d be interested in being able to purchase sets of leather for the basket or tray from my shop. Handles for the basket are now in my shop!

Tiny Treasures Basket & Tray Free Pattern - Noodlehead

Have a great weekend!

Sew Along

Handmade Style Tunic Sew Along – Day 5

Welcome to the last day of the Handmade Style tunic sew along! Today we’re left with finishing the hem. Pretty easy, right?!

Handmade Style Tunic Sew Along - Day 5, Noodlehead

Before we get to the nitty gritty, I figured I might as well show off my finished tunic. I’m really happy with how it turned out. It’s been so hot and humid here, and when I was wearing the tunic, it felt so cool and comfy. I think this particular print kind of hides the pretty details of the tunic, but I still love it anyway. It’s different enough from my coral version that it feels like a totally different top.

Handmade Style Tunic Sew Along - Day 5, Noodlehead

I paired the tunic with some comfy leggings and the most uncomfortable heels. Actually the heels are a really nice shoe, but I’m definitely not used to wearing them. I think they look pretty at least!

Handmade Style Tunic Sew Along - Day 5, Noodlehead

Handmade Style Tunic Sew Along - Day 5, Noodlehead

The finish I chose for the hem uses single fold bias tape. I really like this type of hem finish, it feels a little more fancy, plus it could be a fun place to add a little splash of hidden color. However, you could definitely do a traditional double turn hem. The curved hem is my favorite detail, but you could straighten it or make it more gradual, too. It’s up to you.

Start by opening the single fold bias tape you made on Day 1 and fold the short end to the wrong side by 1/2″. Align that folded edge to the side seam of the right side of the tunic’s bottom raw edge.

hemstart

I start by placing a pin at the beginning and start sewing and work my way around the hem until I reach the beginning, overlapping where I started and trimming any excess bias tape. You’ll be sewing along the fold closest to the raw edge of the tunic, the first fold. Use the natural give in the bias tape to conform it to the curves of the hem.

hemtrim

Press the seam allowance away from the tunic then refold the bias tape so it lays wrong sides together with the tunic completely on the inside of the garment. The seam you had just sewn will now be the bottom edge of the tunic. Press the bias tape in place and pin being sure to neatly tuck in the raw edges where the bias tape overlapped. Pin in place.

hem3

hem2

Sew along the inner fold of the bias tape using a slightly longer stitch length. Be careful not to stretch the hem, but to let it gradually feed through your machine.

hem

That’s all! You’re finished! Now it’s time to try it on and start thinking of the different ways you can wear your new tunic!

Sew along notes: I’ll be spreading out the posts to be once a week, which will hopefully be a nice amount of time to get through each step as well as being easy to get caught up in case your schedule is full this summer! And of course feel free to work at your own pace, the posts will be permanent here on my blog, so reference them any time you need. If you have any questions please let me know in the comments below.

Handmade Style Tunic Sew Along – Day 1
Handmade Style Tunic Sew Along – Day 2
Handmade Style Tunic Sew Along – Day 3
Handmade Style Tunic Sew Along – Day 4

If you still need a copy of my book, you can purchase a copy of Handmade Style at your local quilt shop, Joann’s, local bookstore or Amazon. Or, check with your local library, too.

And that’s a wrap! I hope you’ve enjoyed making your tunic.

Handmade Style Tunic Sew Along - Day 5, Noodlehead